Monday, June 25, 2007

Burger Fuel IPO: Burger Fool?

There are many things that are still unclear in the manifold press releases regarding the Burger Fuel IPO.

I understood the 15M from the IPO was for expansion of outlets but then the IPO according to some, is about the royalty revenue from franchising the Burger Fuel concept.

The figures given in the press releases(I havent read the prospectus as I cant seem to download it from the BF website) seem to stress the 3M odd income and 250,000 odd loss for the last 9 months or so.

One might imagine then that BF may want to open some company owned stores with the 15M. Lets face it, to fit out, train staff, leases and the like to start one of those stores is well north of half a mil, so you aint going to get more than 20 stores for that 15M IPO moola.

There is also that key comment that initial shareholders will have the right to buy shares at $1 again in the next 18 months or so.

Another factor is that public holders only get 25% of the action, so that 3M odd revenue mentioned is less than a million for the likes of you and me.

The real money for this company will be in growing the franchise model. As we have seen in New Zealand Restaurant Brands(RBD) is the poorer cousin to its big daddy YUM! the franchisor.

Having said that though, even if BF grew revenue to 500M (picked high just to prove a point) the typical royalty rate of around 8% of the gross would give 40M in gross revenue for the Burger Fuel Franchisor. Only 25% of that 40M revenue would be available to distribute to public shareholders. After tax and costs less than 10M in profit is available as profit to minority shareholders.

Much has been made of the "brand strength" and the "loyalty" of Burger Fuels' customers but this is typical of niche players in the fast food industry. Once size and scale are increased, this loyalty often wanes as the company culture cant help but change as it grows.

An important understatement by BF management in announcing this IPO is the amount of competition that they face in this sector. New Zealand has some competition but in markets like Sydney, where they have one store, there are several many similar to BF. One also must remember, having success in a market like Sydney is no gaurantee that it is going to work further afield.

It appears that management want to grow this business quicker than they have been and one must ask why, if the business is that good, why they wouldnt get a bank or private equity crew on board to get a little larger, prove their concept has scalabilty, then come out of the closet for some public funds, for goodness sake they are still holding 75% of the company!!

The lesser disclosure requirements due to a listing on the NZAX ,coupled with the bulk of the company still being management owned, mean that human nature, as it is ,favours the dominant player in this scenario and that means the majority of the power and future gain, if any, will be in the hands of those at the top of the tree. Fine if you have full disclosure but here we dont.

The recent Blackstone IPO in the United States is a similar scenario to this one. Public participants hold a minority of shares and management will continue to run the company just like a private one. Both will only want to know you if they want more capital.

Like any investment, before you consider plunking down your hard earned dollars on this one, take a good long read of the Burger Fuel prospectus, then forget it and read the overwhelming negative comment being made about this IPO. If you are still interested after that and are prepared to take a huge risk, go ahead.

It is possible, if you really want to buy Burger Fuel shares, that the SP will adjust to below the IPO price of $1 once the hype of the IPO is over and the reality of the deal sets into the market.

Dont plunk down more than you can afford to lose.


C Share Investor 2007

Sky City CEO resigns

Sky City Entertainment Group Limited (NS) SKC 25 Jun, 2007, 09:40 OFFICE SKYCITY Managing Director to Stand Down

Full Text of Announcement

The Board of Directors of SKYCITY Entertainment Group Limited announced today that Evan Davies will stand down as Managing Director and a director of the company effective immediately.

SKYCITY Entertainment Group Chairman Rod McGeoch recognised the leadership of Evan Davies over the last eleven years.

"Evan Davies' vision for SKYCITY has played a pivotal role in the development of this business. It has seen the company grow from a single site in Auckland to a truly diversified trans-Tasman entertainment company. This has allowed us to maximise SKYCITY's scale, assets and brand. He has delivered market leadership, market reach and market brand which provide a sound base for future growth," said Mr McGeoch.

Mr Davies said "In the last eleven years SKYCITY has grown to a business with a market capitalisation of around $2 billion. Without doubt the last 12-18 months have been challenging. However, in my view the initiatives announced to the market on May 22 will ensure SKYCITY is positioned for long term sustainable growth to deliver shareholder value".

Mr McGeoch said a search for the new Managing Director would begin immediately and candidates would be sought from New Zealand, Australia and globally.

"In the interim, director Elmar Toime will step into the role of Executive Director." Formerly Chief Executive Officer of New Zealand Post, and credited with leading New Zealand Post through its transformation into one of the top rated postal services internationally, Elmar will be based in Auckland to undertake the interim Executive Director position.

"Elmar's extensive international experience at both management and board level will provide the company with sound guidance while the global search is undertaken."

Mr McGeoch said the board and management of the company remain committed to delivering on the restructuring and operational initiatives designed to increase revenues, reduce costs and maximise margins to improve underlying business growth, particularly in Auckland.

An update on the search and on developments in the business will be given at the annual result announcement on August 20th.


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Sunday, June 24, 2007

Burger Fuel Worldwide: Inside Info?

There maybe mostly bad press going around about the internet concerning the BurgerFuel Worldwide [BFW.NZ] IPO but it is a VERY popular search on the search engines "Burger Fuel IPO" comes up for my blog search on a regular basis.

Interest is very high.

A poster calling him/herself "Fuel Employee" has said the following very recently in response to the following post of mine:



Burger Fuel IPO: Dont buy...yet.

The upcoming Burger Fuel IPO poses some interesting questions.

They are asking for 15M for a 25% of the company and value the whole shooting match at 60M. That is steep for a company with only 3M sales and a 250,000 loss.

20 outlets makes the unit sales an average of around $150,000 turnover a unit. Not good at all. You should be looking for at least $500,000 a unit for an outlet like that.

The 15M raised is going to be used on expansion and there is of course the possibility that the majority owners will want continuing cash inputs to keep growing.

I think at $1 a share you could pick up this puppy for less than that once we see continued losses mount.

There is alot of competition in this sector, in NZ and abroad, where BF intend to do business.

Having said that, the long-term future of the company could be worth a punt but I have reservations. I like companies to be making profits from day one and for expansion to be funded from profit.

I would avoid at this stage.

I wont be buying at the IPO, perhaps later.



Fuel Employee wrote

I think you'll find the the 3M sales and the $250,000 odd loss is a reflection of Burger Fuel head office only. The Ponsonby store alone turns over between 1.5 and 2M per annum.


I replied

With the noticable lack of info from the Burger Fuel boys how are we to know what you say is true, im not accusing you of being less than honest though.

Your figures would give BF conservative sales of $40M a much better prospect, if what you say can be validated.

As far as I can tell though ,the companies revenue-and the company at the centre of the IPO- be it food sales or royalties from frachisees the stated income is just over 3M with a loss of 250,000 odd.

Until we we out here in the unwashed uninformed world(it appears you are better informed than us)hear anything different then we can only go by what we know.

Can you enlighten us further?

The poster colours himself/herself as an insider.

A question to pose is. If "Fuel Employee" is a genuine employee then why would he/she risk management ire if caught? Then again if this individual is part of management are they just trying to counter the overwhelming bad press that this Burger Fuel IPO has garnered thus far and would you want to be involved with management that sneaks out info to the public instead of fully divulging it from the outset.

Share Investor smells a rat in the burger kitchen.


Burger Fuel Worldwide @ Share Investor

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Discuss BFW @ Share Investor Forum - Register free
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From Fishpond.co.nz

Every Bastard Says No: The 42 Below Story

Buy Every Bastard Says No - The 42 Below Story, by Geoff Ross & Justine Troy & more @ Fishpond.co.nz

Fishpond


c Share Investor 2007

Kiwisaver: The Details

What is it?


KiwiSaver is a voluntary, work-based savings initiative to help you with your long-term saving for retirement.

It's designed to be hassle-free so it's easy to maintain a regular savings pattern.

Work-based saving

For many people, KiwiSaver will be work-based. This means you will receive information about KiwiSaver from your employer, and your KiwiSaver contributions will come straight out of your pay.

What you get when you retire

NZ Super provides for a basic standard of living in retirement, but it may not be enough for the kind of retirement you want.

KiwiSaver is intended to complement NZ Super. Starting KiwiSaver as early as you can could make a big difference to your quality of life later on.

To find out how much you are likely to need in retirement, visit the Sorted website or seek advice from a financial advisor.

Government initiative


The government created the framework for the KiwiSaver initiative, to help New Zealanders financially prepare for retirement.

There is a range of membership benefits to encourage you to get saving, including a $1,000 tax-free kick-start, a member tax credit of up to $1,042.86 per year and subsidised scheme fees. Some people may also be eligible for help with the deposit on their first home.

Who's involved?

The design of the KiwiSaver initiative was an interagency project involving the Treasury, Inland Revenue, the Ministry of Economic Development and Housing New Zealand Corporation.

The ongoing administration of KiwiSaver will be the responsibility of both Government agencies and scheme providers. Employers also play a key role.

KiwiSaver scheme providers


KiwiSaver scheme providers will have the primary relationship with members.

A list of providers with fully-registered KiwiSaver schemes is now available. The official register of KiwiSaver schemes is held by the Government Actuary.

Organisations wanting to provide KiwiSaver schemes must meet specific criteria. An organisation must be certified by Inland Revenue before they can register a KiwiSaver scheme with the Government Actuary.

KiwiSaver schemes are governed by trust deeds and regulated like other superannuation schemes. Scheme providers must meet certain minimum ongoing requirements and disclose information to help people make an informed choice.

Employers

For most people, KiwiSaver is a work-based savings plan so employers play an important role. Employers give new employees and other staff who are interested a KiwiSaver employee information pack (KS3). They also pass their employees' details to Inland Revenue to enable them to be enrolled, and deduct KiwiSaver contributions from employees' gross salary or wages.

Employers can be more actively involved by making employer contributions or choosing a KiwiSaver scheme for employees who don't want to select their own.

Government


Under the KiwiSaver initiative the Government:

contributes $1,000 (tax-free) to each member's savings when they join for the first time
pays a member tax credit of up to $1,042.86 to members who are 18 or over
pays a fee subsidy of $20 into each member's account every six months
funds the first home deposit subsidy through Housing New Zealand for people who meet their criteria
exempts employer contributions to members' KiwiSaver accounts from specified superannuation contribution withholding tax (SSCWT) up to a maximum of 4% of the employee's before-tax pay.
The Government has appointed six "default" KiwiSaver scheme providers for members who don't choose their own scheme. The default providers are:

AMP Services (NZ) Limited
ASB Group Investments Limited
ING (NZ) Limited
Mercer Human Resource Consulting Limited
National Mutual Corporate Superannuation Services Limited (trading as AXA New Zealand)
TOWER Employee Benefits Limited.

These default providers were selected using an open, competitive tender process managed by the Ministry of Economic Development.

There is no Crown guarantee of KiwiSaver schemes or investment products of KiwiSaver schemes. Every investment statement relating to a KiwiSaver scheme must contain a statement to that effect.


How it works


Your KiwiSaver account with your scheme provider is kick-started with a one-off $1,000 tax free contribution from the government. Each pay day your contribution is deducted from your pay for investment through your KiwiSaver account. You can choose to save 4%, or 8% to speed things up. Every year the government will also pay into your account a member tax credit matching the contributions you've made that year, up to a maximum of $1,042.86.


Membership

KiwiSaver membership is voluntary. To join KiwiSaver you must be:

a New Zealand citizen, or be entitled to live in New Zealand indefinitely, and
personally present (or normally present) in New Zealand, and
below the age of eligibility for NZ Super, currently 65.
This means that New Zealand citizens, Australian citizens and people who hold either a New Zealand or Australian residence permit can become KiwiSaver members.

State Sector employees serving outside New Zealand can also join.

People who hold temporary, visitor or student permits cannot be KiwiSaver members.

Joining KiwiSaver

Joining KiwiSaver is easy - either through automatic enrolment when starting a new job or by choosing to join.

Automatic enrolment

If you're 18 years or over, starting a new job with a new employer from 1 July 2007, you may be automatically enrolled. This means that contributions will start to be deducted from your pay on your first payday and will continue unless you opt out. You'll have eight weeks to decide if you want to remain a KiwiSaver member or opt out.

Your employer is responsible for deciding if automatic enrolment applies to you.

There are some exceptions to automatic enrolment. You won't be automatically enrolled if you:

are a casual agricultural worker, election day worker or private domestic worker
are employed on a temporary employment contract of 28 days or less
are on paid parental leave
stay on the same payroll (ie when a business is taken over or amalgamated, or if you relocate with the same employer)
receive payments subject to withholding tax
are not a New Zealand resident
don't normally live here (unless you are a government employee working overseas)
are not required to have PAYE deductions made from your salary or wages.
If you start a new job as a temporary employee or a casual agricultural worker, you will only become eligible for automatic enrolment if your employment is extended beyond four weeks for temporary employees, or three months for casual agricultural workers. Your employer is responsible for deciding if automatic enrolment will apply to you.

Opting in

Other people can choose to join by opting in. This includes:

existing employees aged 18 and over, and temporary and casual workers who can also join through their employer
self-employed people
people under the age of 18
people who are not working, including beneficiaries.
If you opt in to KiwiSaver you can't opt out.

Joining when you're already in a job

If you're already in a job, eligible and want to join KiwiSaver, you can opt in.

If you're 18 or over, you can do this by simply completing the KiwiSaver deduction notice (KS2) and giving it to your employer. KiwiSaver deductions will start from the next pay your employer calculates. We will then allocate you to a scheme.

Alternatively, if you know which KiwiSaver scheme you'd like to join or you're under 18, you should opt in by contacting the scheme provider and applying directly. They'll give your details to us and we'll tell your employer to start deducting contributions from your pay.

Joining if you're self-employed

If you're self-employed, you'll need to choose a scheme provider and apply directly. You and your provider will need to decide how much you'll contribute.

Under 18

People under 18 can join KiwiSaver but only by choosing and contacting a KiwiSaver scheme provider directly.

If a provider of a KiwiSaver scheme accepts a person who is aged under 18 as a member of a KiwiSaver scheme, the contract between the provider and the person must be treated, for the purposes of the Minors' Contracts Act 1969, as if the person were aged 18.

Joining if you're not working

If you're not working, a beneficiary or under 18, you can still join KiwiSaver, but you'll need to contact a KiwiSaver scheme provider and apply directly.

Opting out

If you're a new employee who is subject to automatic enrolment and don't want to become a KiwiSaver member, you can choose to opt out. However, you can't opt out until you've been in your job for two weeks, but you must opt out within eight weeks. If you don't opt out in this timeframe you'll remain a KiwiSaver member and deductions will continue to be made from your pay.

You'll be able to opt out through this website or by completing the opt-out form in the employee information pack you will get from your employer.

If you opt out, any contributions already deducted from your pay will be refunded.

Late opt out

If events outside of your control mean you can't complete the opt-out form within eight weeks of starting your new job, you can apply for a late opt out. We have limited discretion to accept late opt outs for up to three months after receiving your first contribution.

We may accept a late opt-out notice if:

your employer did not supply you with an information pack within seven days of you starting your job
we did not send you an investment statement for the default KiwiSaver scheme that you were allocated to
your employer did not supply an investment statement for their chosen KiwiSaver scheme
events outside your control prevented you from delivering your opt-out notice on time.
If you already have a retirement savings scheme
You can still join KiwiSaver if you already save through another superannuation scheme.

You should discuss your options with your financial advisor.

Get financial advice

KiwiSaver is not guaranteed by the government. This means that you invest in a KiwiSaver scheme at your own risk.

Neither your employer nor Inland Revenue can give you financial advice about whether KiwiSaver is the right choice for you.

For help deciding whether you can join, visit the Retirement Commission's Sorted website. Sorted provides free and independent information about money matters, including KiwiSaver.

Alternatively, contact a financial advisor for advice on:

your personal financial circumstances
whether or not KiwiSaver is right for you
how to choose a scheme or investment product
the overall KiwiSaver scheme and its financial concepts.


Role of employers

Your employer deducts your KiwiSaver contributions from your pay, so you don't have to think about it.

Employers' main KiwiSaver responsibilities include:

giving new employees a KiwiSaver information pack when they start, if the employer is satisfied the person should be automatically enrolled
giving us the names, IRD numbers and addresses of all new employees and those who want to join KiwiSaver, using a new form - KiwiSaver enrolment details (KS1) that they send in monthly with their employer's monthly schedule
deducting employees' contributions from their gross pay and forwarding them to us along with their PAYE
ensuring new employees' contributions start from their first pay
refunding any contributions deducted if they haven't been passed on to us when an employee opts out of KiwiSaver
providing investment statements for all employees if the employer has chosen a preferred KiwiSaver scheme.
acting on opt-out and contributions holiday letters
keeping the required KiwiSaver records.
Employer contributions
Employers can also contribute to their employees' KiwiSaver accounts. These contributions can currently count towards your minimum contribution of 4%, and are exempt from specified superannuation contribution withholding tax (SSCWT) up to a cap of whichever is less - your contribution or 4% of your gross pay.

In Budget 2007 the government announced significant enhancements to KiwiSaver, including a proposal that from 1 April 2008:

employers will match employee contributions for KiwiSaver (phased in over four years)
employers will receive a tax credit for up to $20 a week per employee
employer contributions will not count towards your minimum contribution of 4% - transitional rules will apply for those employees who already have employer contributions counting towards their minimum contribution of 4%.
Legislation giving effect to these changes is currently before Parliament. It is expected to be passed later this year, subject to changes at Select Committee stage.



Further information for employers about what KiwiSaver means for them is on the Inland Revenue website.

Employer-chosen schemes


Your employer can choose to have a KiwiSaver scheme for employees who don't choose a scheme of their own. This way, employees who don't choose their own savings scheme are allocated to the employer's chosen provider, instead of a default scheme allocated by Inland Revenue.

An employer can choose a KiwiSaver scheme only if all their new permanent employees are eligible to be members of the scheme.

If an employee ceases to be eligible to be a member of an employer's chosen KiwiSaver scheme, the employer, or the provider as the employer's agent, must notify both the member and Inland Revenue.

"Exempt" employers

All employers will have to offer KiwiSaver in their workplace. However, any employer who already offers a registered superannuation scheme that meets certain criteria may seek an exemption from the requirement to automatically enrol their new employees.

Exempt employers will still have to have KiwiSaver available to any staff who want to join.

Your pay

KiwiSaver is designed to make regular saving easy. If you earn a salary or wages your contributions are deducted from your gross pay.

If you don't earn a salary or wages from which PAYE is deducted when you join KiwiSaver, for example if you're self-employed, you agree with your scheme provider how much you're going to contribute.

For employees

If you're an employee, your KiwiSaver contributions will be deducted at the rate of 4% of your gross pay (that means your total salary, including bonuses, commission, overtime, gratuities or any other kind of remuneration). Or, you can contribute 8%. There are no minimum or maximum income thresholds for deductions.

You can switch between contribution rates by asking your employer to change your rate from 4% to 8%, or 8% to 4%. You cannot do this more often than quarterly, unless your employer agrees.

Unless you're on a contributions holiday, contributions will continue to be deducted while you're an employee. However, if you're out of the workforce for any reason and are no longer being paid by your employer, your contributions will stop automatically unless you make arrangements to keep them going.

If your employer deducts your regular contribution from your pay, but doesn't pass it on, we'll still make the payment to your scheme provider (up to a maximum of 8% of your gross pay) and follow up with your employer.

This guarantee only applies to deductions of up to 8% of your gross salary or wage. Any contributions above 8%, including any extra voluntary contributions you make, are not guaranteed.

Your employer's contributions

Your employer may contribute to your KiwiSaver savings, and they'll tell you if they do and whether there are any special terms and conditions. If certain criteria are met your employer's contribution can currently count towards your KiwiSaver contribution rate of 4% or 8%, or it can be on top of your contribution.

Extra contributions

You can make voluntary lump sum payments whenever you like. Once you've made a lump sum payment you can't withdraw it until your savings mature. You can pay lump sums to us by:

choosing the "Pay tax" option on your internet banking service
paying over the counter at any Westpac branch
sending a cheque to us.
Your scheme provider may also accept lump sum contributions.

In the first three months

All KiwiSaver contributions need to be paid through Inland Revenue from 1 July 2007 to 1 October 2007. We will send your contributions on to your scheme provider three months after we receive the first contribution from your employer. We will pay interest on these contributions.

Scheme providers can only accept KiwiSaver contributions after 1 October 2007.

Contributions holiday - temporary breaks from saving

After you've been contributing to KiwiSaver for 12 months you can apply for a savings break, called a contributions holiday, of between three months and five years. There is no limit to the number of times you can take a contributions holiday. If you take a contributions holiday you can still make lump sum payments.

If you suffer financial hardship within the first 12 months of saving, talk to Inland Revenue. You may be eligible for an early contributions holiday.

Only employees who have KiwiSaver deductions from their salary or wages can take a contributions holiday. Other members, such as self-employed people, can't take contributions holidays and will need to negotiate a savings break with their scheme provider.


Going on holiday

If you take a trip overseas or in New Zealand, but are still paid by a New Zealand employer, your KiwiSaver contributions will continue unless you take a contributions holiday.

Sick leave

If you take paid sick leave your KiwiSaver contributions will continue.

KiwiSaver for self-employed people

The contract with the provider will cover how much and how often you must make contributions. You'll be able to make payments either directly to your KiwiSaver scheme provider or via Inland Revenue for on-payment to the scheme provider. Until October 2007 all contributions must be paid via Inland Revenue.

If you later start earning a salary or wage, contributions will start being deducted.

Special circumstances

NZ Super
KiwiSaver is designed to complement NZ Super, to give people a better standard of living in retirement. Being a KiwiSaver member will not affect your eligibility for NZ Super.

More than one job

If you have more than one job when you join KiwiSaver, you can choose which jobs you'll contribute from. This could be one or more of your jobs.

You'll have to contribute from any new jobs you start, unless you take a contributions holiday. To ensure you have the flexibility to only contribute from the jobs you want to, you can take a contributions holiday after 12 months' membership and apply it to any or all of your jobs, or opt out if this option is available at the time you start the new job.

ACC

KiwiSaver members who receive weekly compensation from ACC will be able to choose whether to have KiwiSaver contributions deducted from their payments.


Paid parental leave

If your employer continues to pay you when you're on parental leave, your KiwiSaver contributions will continue to be deducted from your pay. If you want to stop them you can take a contributions holiday.

If you're not being paid by your employer while you're on parental leave, your contributions will stop automatically but you can keep them going by contacting Inland Revenue. Your contributions will start again when you're back at work.

Beneficiaries

People on an income-tested benefit will not have KiwiSaver contributions deducted from their benefit. If you start receiving a benefit and have no paid employment, your KiwiSaver deductions will stop automatically. However, you can choose to pay contributions directly to your scheme provider or to Inland Revenue.

If you get paid by an employer while receiving a benefit, KiwiSaver contributions will be deducted from your pay. If you want to stop them you can request a contributions holiday.

Bankruptcy

If you are declared bankrupt, your KiwiSaver contributions may be recovered by the Official Assignee in certain circumstances.

Benefits and incentives

Starting incentive

To get your savings off to a good start, the government will kick-start your KiwiSaver account with a tax-free contribution of $1,000. This kick-start will be paid to your scheme provider. This is a unique benefit of KiwiSaver and is not available to people who choose to save for their retirement through other schemes.

Member tax credit

If you're 18 or over, each year the government will pay into your account a member tax credit matching the contributions you've made that year, up to a maximum of $1,042.86. This is the equivalent of up to $20 a week. This will be paid until you're eligible to access your savings - when you're eligible for NZ Super (currently 65) or after five years' membership, whichever is later. To qualify for the member tax credit, your principal place of residence must be in New Zealand (although there are some exceptions).

Fee subsidy


The government will pay a subsidy of $20 into your KiwiSaver account twice a year to subsidise the fees charged by your scheme provider. The subsidy will be paid into your account until you qualify for NZ Super (currently 65) or after five years' membership, whichever is later.

Buying your first home

If you're intending to buy your first home, KiwiSaver can be a way of getting into the habit of regular saving.

After contributing to KiwiSaver for three years you may be able to withdraw all or part of your savings (excluding the $1,000 government contribution and member tax credit) to put towards buying your first home (not an investment property).

First home deposit subsidy


If you've been contributing around 4% of your income to KiwiSaver or to an approved alternative superannuation scheme, you may also be entitled to a first home deposit subsidy from the government through Housing New Zealand Corporation. The subsidy is $1,000 per year of membership in a scheme, up to a maximum of $5,000 for five years for each member.

The eligibility criteria are set by Housing New Zealand and include household income and regional house price caps. The first home deposit subsidy is administered by Housing New Zealand and will be available from 2010. To find out more visit the Housing New Zealand website.

Use KiwiSaver to help pay your mortgage

After you've been a KiwiSaver member for 12 months, you may be able to split your contributions - up to half towards repaying the mortgage on your home and the rest to your KiwiSaver savings. This is called "mortgage diversion".

Mortgage diversion may be available for new and existing mortgages, but can only be used towards the mortgage on your main home (not an investment property or holiday home). Once your mortgage is paid off, all contributions would go to your KiwiSaver account.

Your member tax credit and any contributions your employer makes cannot be diverted to your mortgage. Contributions you divert to your mortgage do not qualify for the member tax credit.

Not all KiwiSaver scheme providers and mortgage providers will offer this, and some types of mortgages will be excluded (for example, revolving credit mortgages) so if this option is important to you, check it out before you join up.


For KiwiSaver members

KiwiSaver schemes

With KiwiSaver you can choose a savings scheme to suit you. There will be a range of scheme providers and several investment types, from conservative risk to growth funds. You can change KiwiSaver schemes but can only belong to one KiwiSaver scheme at any time.

KiwiSaver is not guaranteed by the government. This means that you invest in a KiwiSaver scheme at your own risk.

A list of providers with fully-registered KiwiSaver schemes is now available. The official register of KiwiSaver schemes is held by the Government Actuary.

Allocating you to a scheme

If you're being automatically enrolled, or if you're an existing employee who has opted in through your employer, you'll be allocated to your employer's chosen KiwiSaver scheme, if they have one, or to a default KiwiSaver scheme. If you're allocated to a default scheme it will be a "conservative fund". Six financial institutions have been appointed by the government to be default scheme providers. This process was managed by the Ministry of Economic Development. The default providers are:

AMP Services (NZ) Limited
ASB Group Investments Limited
ING (NZ) Limited
Mercer Human Resource Consulting Limited
National Mutual Corporate Superannuation Services Limited (trading as AXA New Zealand)
TOWER Employee Benefits Limited.
When you're allocated to a scheme, you'll receive a letter from us advising which scheme it is, and a copy of their investment statement. If your employer has a chosen scheme, you'll receive a copy of their investment statement from your employer.

Please make sure that you read the investment statement. This is an important document that sets out the specific rules, fees, terms and conditions of the scheme and explains how your money will be invested.

Your contributions will be held by us for the first three months to give you time to get financial advice and choose your own scheme if you want to. After three months, if you haven't opted out or chosen your own scheme, you'll be enrolled in the scheme you were allocated to. Your contributions will be paid, with interest, to the scheme. The $1,000 government kick-start and first fee subsidy will be paid into your scheme account at the same time.

Choosing a scheme

You can choose your own KiwiSaver scheme at any time by applying to the provider of the scheme you want to belong to. If you choose your own scheme within the first three months of starting your new job, this will override the allocation process. If you want to change your scheme, you must apply to the provider of the new scheme you want to join. You can only belong to one KiwiSaver scheme at any time.

Accessing savings

Your contributions are invested for you. Your scheme provider's investment statement will explain how they will invest your money and what returns you can expect.

You can withdraw your savings (including the government kick-start and member tax credits) as a lump sum when you qualify for NZ Super (currently 65) or after five years' membership, whichever is later.

You may be able to withdraw your savings earlier:

after three years to buy your first home (excluding the government kick-start and member tax credit)
if you experience significant financial hardship (excluding the government kick-start and member tax credit)
if you suffer serious illness (excluding the government kick-start but including the member tax credit)
if you emigrate permanently (including the government kick-start but excluding the member tax credit which is paid back to the government).
In most cases you apply to your KiwiSaver scheme provider if you want to withdraw your savings. If you experience significant financial hardship or serious illness within the first three months of contributing, you'll need to apply to us.

On your death, your savings will be paid to your estate.

Friday, June 22, 2007

Burger Fuel IPO: Dont buy...yet.

The upcoming BurgerFuel Worldwide [BFW.NZ] IPO poses some interesting questions.

They are asking for 15M for a 25% of the company and value the whole shooting match at 60M. That is steep for a company with only 3M sales and a 250,000 loss.

20 outlets makes the unit sales an average of around $150,000 turnover a unit. Not good at all. You should be looking for at least $500,000 a unit for an outlet like that.

The 15M raised is going to be used on expansion and there is of course the possibility that the majority owners will want continuing cash inputs to keep growing.

I think at $1 a share you could pick up this puppy for less than that once we see continued losses mount.

There is alot of competition in this sector, in NZ and abroad, where BF intend to do business.

Having said that, the long-term future of the company could be worth a punt but I have reservations. I like companies to be making profits from day one and for expansion to be funded from profit.

I would avoid at this stage.

I wont be buying at the IPO, perhaps later.


See press release below:

Burger Fuel looks for extra capital filling
NBR staff

Josef Roberts & Chris Mason

Fast-food franchise BurgerFuel is set to list on the NZAX and is looking to raise $15 million in capital.

The company is issuing 15 million shares at $1 each, with the option of purchasing additional shares at the same price in 18-months time.

The issue values the whole company at $60 million with public shareholders owning 26.7 per cent.

The remaining shares will held by staff, associate directors and the promoters of the offer, as well as the founder and managing director of the company Chris Mason and Executive Director, Josef Roberts.

Both Chris Mason and Josef Roberts have entered into stand-still agreements running for 12 months in respect of their shares.

The funds will be used to fund expansion into Australia, Europe and the US. At present, BurgerFuel has 19 outlets in New Zealand, and one in Sydney.

Prospectuses can be viewed at www.burgerfuel.com/shares

The company says it is taking an innovative and irreverent approach to capital raising, including a provision for 70,000 of its "VIB members" ("Very Important Burger Connoisseurs") to get the first chance to purchase shares.


Burger Fuel Worldwide @ Share Investor

Burgerfuel: Dubai Marketing Hype!!!
Burger Fuel 2010 Full Year Profit Analysis
Burger Fuel 2010 Full Year Profit Preview
Burger Fuel Worldwide: 2009 Half Year profit analysis
Stock of the Week: Burger Fuel Worldwide
Download full company analysis from Thomson First-Call
Burger Fuel doesn't rule out capital raising
Burger Fuel Worldwide: Closer look at Company Accounts
Analysis - Burger Fuel Worldwide: FY profit to 31/03/09
Burger Fuel: Running on Empty
Burger Fuel leaves investors hungry
Burger Fuel management cagey over company progress
Burger Fuel cooks up Dubai deal
NZX share trades with strings attached
Don't buy Burger Fuel, yet
Burger Fuel: Inside info?
Burger Fool IPO: Burger Fool?
Exclusive Interview with Burger Fuel's Josef Roberts
Burger Fuel's Daytime drama
Burger Fuel share price out of gas
Beefing up store numbers
Director explains share price drop
Burger Fuel slims down in value
Burger Fuel and Coke
Marketing Burger Fuel's future
Pumpkin Patch VS Burger Fuel
Burger Fuel results and commentary

Discuss BFW @ Share Investor Forum - Register free
Download BFW Company Reports


From Fishpond.co.nz

Every Bastard Says No: The 42 Below Story

Buy Every Bastard Says No - The 42 Below Story, by Geoff Ross & Justine Troy & more @ Fishpond.co.nz

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c Share Investor 2007

Global Warning: Tax Iceberg Ahead


It is like sitting on the bow of the Titanic while watching it hit an iceberg. We know it is coming but we don't yet know how big the iceberg is.

Let me help you out dear reader.

If one thought the budget was a killer to business and the economy and it clearly is: increased compliance costs, contributions to employees' savings and the two headed monster the inflationary petrol tax-the 3c cut to business tax still puts business behind- then you have got another thing coming.

The biggest thing missing from the 2007 budget was an indication of looming carbon taxes and costs associated with Labour's lunacy over Kyoto and the global warming myth.

It wasn't even given the once over lightly, in fact it wasn't mentioned at all.

In what will be New Zealand business' biggest challenge in generations, global warming taxes, Cullen is playing fast and lose with our kiwi companies simply because they cannot plan with certainty of the future.

These costs loom large in board rooms around the country, only the NZX board room is relaxed because they look likely to benefit from implementing so-called "carbon trading."

The costs to business and the economy cannot be overstated. Businesses, and eventually individuals who emit carbon will be taxed on those emissions. How much we don't know but what we do know is that these taxes will flow down to the consumer and put a bite on the economy with such force that we may never recover.

Like the 2007 budget, the only winners from carbon taxes will be Governments and an army of bureaucrats who will administer the taxes from yet another acre of new Wellington office space.

The two business sectors with the most to lose will be tourism and agriculture, incidentally the 2 biggest earners of foreign exchange for New Zealand Inc. According to those with a green tinge to their blood, including Sir Richard Branson, airline travel is one of the biggest contributors to Global Warming, with the shipping sector and distance traveled by those ships to get goods to market from this part of the world 2 targets for the highest taxes and red tape due to the perception of their "global carbon footprint."

Already New Zealand's agriculture industry has been given a wake-up call over "food miles" and Tesco in Britain discouraging buying of NZ produce because of the distance it has come. Commentators such as Rod Oram are foisted on their own Global Warming crusades, when they on the one hand advocate for GW and carbon taxes(Oram buys carbon credits to off-set his "carbon footprint")but on the other hand moan when the likes of Tesco actually use the argument he advocates against him.

The tourism industry clearly faces a bleak future if these new taxes take a strangle-hold. The further away a destination, the higher the taxes will be on airfares, airlines and a whole host of industry related business. New Zealand is as far away as one can get from the bulk of the worlds population and it doesn't take Einstein to figure out who the biggest loser will be.

We must not confuse the valid issue of polluting our neighbourhood and planet with the Myth of Global Warming. There has been a turning point in the belief of man-made GW from former believers in the scientific world and the focus should now be to get back to reality and impetus on the real issues around us.

GW associated taxes will kill our already shaky economy and the irony is that the worlds biggest and real polluters will be the beneficiary of our Government's stupidity.


Related Share Investor Reading

Mark Weldon Strikes out on Carbon Trading
Quote of the year
Of Tulip bulbs and Tooth fairies
Global warning: Tax iceberg ahead
Carbon Credit trading puts global markets at extreme risk

Related links

TZ1 Market
Kristen Byrne - 15 year old schoolgirl debunks climate change myth

NZX financial data



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Thursday, June 21, 2007

The Intelligent Investor: Book Review

Review: The Intelligent Investor
by Benjamin Graham


If you don’t have this book in your library, then you should not even be contemplating an investment in shares directly, or even indirectly, though a mutual fund.

It is surely not a co-incidence, as Warren Buffett graphically illustrates in his Appendix to this book, that some of the world’s most successful investors learned at the feet of Benjamin Graham and have applied his principles with great success.

This book, like all of Graham’s writings, is easy enough to understand for even lay investors. Graham sets the scene early in the book by explaining the difference between intelligent investing and mere speculation. Using the history of stock market booms and crashes and illustrating them with real life examples, Graham explains how an intelligent investor can stay ahead of the market.

Graham sets out investment principles for both the defensive investor and one who is more enterprising and shows how investor can identify under priced stocks.

As Warren Buffett has said, the two most important chapters in the book are Chapter 8, The Investor and Market Fluctuations, where Graham develops his concept of Mr Market, and Chapter 20, Margin of Safety where he preaches the wisdom of leaving enough room to cover mistakes in judgment of a share’s intrinsic value.

A must buy book, worth every penny, especially during turbulent times.

Buy the Book From Amazon

Share Investor Blog related reading


Mr Market gets his groove on

C Share Investor 2007

Sky City Entertainment Group Ltd: Underperforming

The recent announcement by the CEO of Sky City Entertainment Group Ltd [SKC.NZX], Evan Davies, that management will be looking over "underperforming assets" leaves more questions to ask than it answers.

Decisions

The timing of management for a reassessment of underperforming assets must be questioned.

Indicators that various units of Sky City's business were not cutting the mustard were obvious years ago.

The Sky City Cinema division is the most glaring example of the inability of management to move on from a dumb decision. Even at the time of purchase of the cinemas, it was obvious that they were never going to perform ,even for a moderate return on capital.

Intense competition from other cinema chains and other forms of media coupled with the high capital expense of continued new technology and the roll-out of more screens, made this purchase one of the worst of its time by any company listed on the NZX.

Management ignored these basic facts and shareholders pleas to cut it loose.

Queenstown Casino

For the life of me I cannot understand the rationale of management in keeping an asset that has never returned wealth to shareholders and has yet to make a profit. It appears to this writer that the status of a casino in the prestigious Queenstown tourist mecca and competition with Skylines outlet there(SKCs partner in the Christchurch Casino) is much more important than making a return on capital. Let Barry Thomas have Queenstown, it will never bring much to the bottom line even if the other casino left town.


Adelaide Casino

The Adelaide Casino has much going for it but it is taking far too long for it to deliver an acceptable return to its owners.

There has been much shareholder money pumped into this gaming den and they have been waiting patiently for the cherries to come up in a set of three. So far only 2 keep appearing.

It doesn't look like management can turn this one around. They have been given ample time and money but still keep shareholders with baited breath that spending millions more on this or that improvement will get more punters in the door and spending. It clearly isn't going to work any time soon.

Why now? Timing.

The most curious question left unanswered is that why, after many long years do Evan Davies and management see fit to look at these and other assets again with a view to remove them perhaps from the Sky City portfolio?

Pressure from shareholders hasn't worked in the past. I'm postulating here that Davies has been pressured by the more astute members of the board to do the honest thing and face up to the reality that some of Sky City's assets just do not belong alongside the good ones : Auckland, Hamilton, Darwin and Christchurch Casinos.

I'm guessing that Davies was given an ultimatum, that he either do something and get rid of the losers or ending up being cut himself.

If Davies only listens to board members and not shareholders do they deserve his leadership at the helm?

The question shareholders must ask themselves is, do we still want Evan Davies as our chief decision maker or do we need to put Sky City in the hands of a CEO who can make decisions, when it is appropriate and timely to do so.

What now? Proceeds of a sell-off

Shareholders have seen the Sky City share price become stagnant over the last 4 years, that is because the market hasn't had confidence in management to do the right thing with the assets and shareholders capital that they have at their disposal.

It is clear that high interest rates and business costs have continued to rise across the entertainment sector and other areas of the economy and Sky City Management have racked up over $NZ 1B of debt with some of the recent acquisitions that they have made on behalf of owners.

The proceeds of a sale of Queenstown Casino, a 40% share of Christchurch Casino(this writer doesn't believe it should be sold)Sky City Cinemas and Adelaide Casino seem to start at around $NZ 600M or there abouts.

75% of the proceeds $450M must go towards paying down debt but the rest $150M must be returned to shareholders via a capital return in the form of a special dividend. Shareholders need some payback for years of average returns.

To leave the proceeds of a asset sale in current managements hands will only encourage another burning hole in the pocket approach to investing and that is the last thing that Sky City needs for a good long term future.

A question still remains.

Who is Evan Davies successor and why isn't he in his chair?


Disc: I own SKC shares in the Share Investor Portfolio


Sky City Convention Centre @ Share Investor

Share Investor discusses Convention Centre proposal with CEO Nigel Morrison
Sky City Convention Centre Expansion a Money Loser: Part Two
Sky City Convention Centre Expansion a Money loser
SKC Convention Centre power-point slide illustrations & SKC submission to Auckland City Council

Sky City Entertainment Group @ Share Investor


Share Investor's Total Returns: Sky City Entertainment Group Ltd
Sky City Entertainment Group Ltd: Presentation to Macquarie Group
Morningstar Revalues Sky City Entertainment Group
Guest Post - Michele Hewitson Interview: Nigel Morrison
Failed Sky City bid for Christchurch Casino good news for Shareholders
Sky City Entertainment Group Ltd: Christchurch Casino bid falls short of Investment Criteria
Sky City Entertainment Group Ltd: Never mind the width feel the volume
Sky City Annual Meeting & 2011 - 2012 Profit Forecast
Stock of the Week: Sky City Entertainment Group Ltd
Sky City set to lose National Convention Centre bid
Sky City Entertainment Group: Australian Acquisition on the Cards?
Sky City Entertainment Group Ltd: 2010 Full Year Profit Analysis
Sky City Entertainment Group 2010 Full Year Profit Preview
Chart of the Week: Sky City Entertainment Group Ltd
Share Investor discusses Convention Centre proposal with CEO Nigel Morrison
Share Investor Q & A: Sky City CEO, Nigel Morrison
Sky City Entertainment: CEO Nigel Morrison discusses 2010 HY
Sky City Convention Centre Expansion a Money Loser: Part Two
Sky City Convention Centre Expansion a Money loser
Sky City Entertainment Group Ltd: Download full Company analysis
Sky City 2010 full year profit looking good
Long Term View: Sky City Entertainment Group Ltd
Sky City Entertainment: CEO Nigel Morrison discusses 2010 Half Year
Sky City Entertainment Group 2010 Interim Profit Review
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Sky City Profit Upgrade: Always on the Cards
Sky City's Current Cinema "Boom" a Horror Story in Disguise
Stock of the Week: Sky City Entertainment Group
Are Insiders selling Sky City Stock?
Sky City Entertainment 2009 Interim Result Preamble
2008 Sky City profit analysis
Sky City share offer confusing and unfair for smaller shareholders
Sky City Entertainment 2008 Full Year profit results , NZX release, 2008 full year presentation, result briefing webcast, financial statements
Sky City 2008 profit preamble
Sky City outlines a clear future plan
As recession bites Sky City bites back
Sky City Assets: Buy, sell and hold
Why did you buy that stock? [Sky City Entertainment]
Sky City Share Volumes set tongues wagging
Sky City half year exceptional on cost cutting
NZX Press release: Sky City profit to HY end Dec 2007
Sky City Cinemas no Blockbuster
Sky City Entertainment share price drop
New Broom set to sweep
Sky City Management: Blind, deaf and numb
Sky City sale could be off
Opposition to takeover
Premium for control
Sky City receives takeover bid
Sky City Casino Full Year Profit to June 30 2007
Setting the record straight
Sky City CEO resigns
Sky City Casino: Under performing
Sky City Casino 2007 HY Profit(analysis)
Sky City Casino 2007 HY Profit


Discuss SKC @ Share Investor Forum
Download SKC Company Reports

Recommended Amazon Reading

The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing. A    Book of Practical Counsel (Revised Edition)
The Intelligent Investor: The Definitive Book on Value Investing. A Book of Practical Counsel (Revised Edition) by Benjamin Graham
Buy new: $14.95 / Used from: $6.99
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c Share Investor 2007